EUS Logo

Upcoming Events

The Big Pivot with Andrew Winston: Webinar

Wednesday, July 30, 2014
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, August 2, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, August 9, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, August 16, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Triumph of the Sun:
How Solar is Killing the Electric Utilities

Friday, August 22, 2014
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Olin Language Center, Room 115
more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, August 23, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, August 30, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, September 6, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, September 13, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, September 20, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, September 27, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Red Hook Outdoor Farmers Market

Saturday, October 4, 2014
10:00 am – 2:00 pm more >

Food Day Celebration

Friday, October 24, 2014
11:30 am – 2:30 pm Kline Commons
more >

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Information Session in
New York City

Thursday, November 6, 2014
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm New York City
more >

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House for Applicants and Interested Students

Saturday, December 6, 2014
11:00 am – 2:00 pm Olin Language Center, Room 115
more >

EUS Professor Gidon Eshel in the news for new Climate/Agriculture Study

EUS Professor Gidon Eshel in the news for new Climate/Agriculture Study
"Cows are not efficient at converting feed to protein for human consumption, said lead author Gidon Eshel, an environmental physics professor at Bard College in New York." -WSJ

EUS students and professors are very interested in the social, economic, and environmental impacts of food. The Bard College Farm experiments with locally-grown vegetables, several EUS classes focus on food, and there have been a number of EUS-sponsored food events (a movie, a panel, speakers, etc.).

One of these EUS professors is Dr. Gidon Eshel, a physicist who studies climate change, oceanography, and meteorology, along with agricultural environmental science. On July 22, 2014 Dr. Eshel and colleagues published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences stating the relative effects of different types of meat consumption. Their conclusion was that beef is the least-environmentally-friendly menu item, in terms of land use, use of irrigated water, greenhouse gas production, and nitrogen runoff. This comprehensive study was edited by the President Emeritus of Bard's science partner, the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies, and written up in a variety of media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, TreeHugger, and the Guardian. Congratulations Gidon!

Overview from www.pnas.org:
"Livestock-based food production is an important and pervasive way humans impact the environment. It causes about one-fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions, and is the key land user and source of water pollution by nutrient overabundance. It also competes with biodiversity, and promotes species extinctions. Empowering consumers to make choices that mitigate some of these impacts through devising and disseminating numerically sound information is thus a key socioenvironmental priority. Unfortunately, currently available knowledge is incomplete and hampered by reliance on divergent methodologies that afford no general comparison of relative impacts of animal-based products. To overcome these hurdles, we introduce a methodology that facilitates such a comparison. We show that minimizing beef consumption mitigates the environmental costs of diet most effectively."

View the entire article at www.pnas.org.

Our Mission

Both biogeophysical systems and human societies (cultures, economies, political regimes) are nested complex systems involving numerous interactions. Environmental and Urban Studies (EUS) is a transdisciplinary program that examines the interdependence of human societies and the physical environment. The program strives to ensure that majors have a solid background in the physical sciences, the humanities, and economics and policy--and understand what sustainability means in the real world. We aim to enhance students' understanding of the complexities of environmental and urban issues and their awareness of interrelationships between built and "natural" environments.