Student-Focused Faculty

Bard has been recognized as the #1 college in America for Classroom Experience by the Princeton Review, and you will not find an M.S. Policy program anywhere in the world in which students receive more one-on-one focus from distinguished faculty. Unlike in other graduate programs, our master's degree faculty do very little teaching of undergraduates, and they do not advise PhD candidates. They are fully dedicated to our students. Bard's class size is small, with a typical entering cohort of between 15 and 20. Our faculty are passionate teachers, active researchers and practitioners, and active mentors, who work closely with students while they are at Bard and continue to support our alumni after they graduate.

 
Kim Knowlton

Kim Knowlton

Adjunct Faculty, Bard Center for Environmental Policy
Senior Scientist, Health & Environment Program and Co-Deputy Director, Science Center, NRDC

Kim Knowlton, DrPH, is Senior Scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)'s health and environment program in New York City and Co-Deputy Director of NRDC’s Science Center. She is also Adjunct Professor at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Assistant Clinical Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; chair of the Global Climate Change and Health Topic Committee of the American Public Health Association’s Environment Section; and Co-Convening Lead Author for the Human Health chapter of the 2013 National Climate Assessment. Kim was among the researchers who participated in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's 2007 Fourth Assessment Report. Her work focuses on the health effects of climate change; advocating for strategies to prepare for and prevent these impacts, especially for our most vulnerable communities; and making health a more central feature of national, state and local climate change adaptation plans. She has researched heat- and ozone-related mortality and illnesses; connections between climate change, pollen, allergies and asthma, as well as infectious diseases like dengue fever; the health costs of climate change; and domestic and international climate-health preparedness strategies. Knowlton holds a master’s degree in environmental and occupational health sciences from Hunter College, and received her doctorate in public health from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.