The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College
The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College

Fellows

Quote
My assumption is that thought itself arises out of incidents of living experience and must remain bound to them as the only guide posts by which to take its bearings.

2014-2015 Fellows

Hannah Arendt Center Senior Fellow

  • Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine. His work also appears in The New York Review of Books, GQ, The London Review of Books and The New Yorker. Modern Library publishes his translations of the complete works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and, in 2006, a National Magazine Award. He has served as a consulting editor at large for the Margellos World Republic of Letters of Yale University Press, an imprint devoted to world literature in translation, and has taught non-fiction writing in the MFA program of Bennington College. He was named a Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center in 2010.

Hannah Arendt Center Visiting Senior Fellows

  • Wilmot James is a noted South African academic-turned-politician who currently is an MP for the Democratic Alliance (DA). He serves as the country’s Shadow Minister of Basic Education and is the Federal Chairperson of the Democratic Alliance. James is an Honorary Professor of Sociology (University of Pretoria) and in the Division of Human Genetics (University of Cape Town). He is chairperson of the board of the Africa Genome Education Institute. James has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison (1982) and a B.A. cum laude from the University of the Western Cape (1977). He has held visiting positions at Yale University, Indiana University, American Bar Foundation (Chicago), the California Institute of Technology, and Edinburgh University. And he has served as chairperson of the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra and the Immigration Advisory Board of South Africa. He is also a former trustee of the New York–based Ford Foundation. 

Hannah Arendt Center Research Associate

  • Thomas Wild,  a premiere Hannah Arendt scholar, is an Assistant Professor of German at Bard College. Dr. Wild studied German literature and culture as well as political science in Berlin, and Munich, where he received his Ph.D. He has taught at institutions of higher learning in Germany, at Vanderbilt University, and at Oberlin College.  Dr. Wild's research and teaching focus on twentieth-century German literature and film, the political dimensions of culture, art and thought, as well as contemporary developments in German media and society after 1989. Among his many publications are a monograph on Hannah Arendt's relationships with key postwar German writers such as Uwe Johnson, Ingeborg Bachmann, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Hilde Domin, and Rolf Hochhuth; an "intellectual biography" of Hannah Arendt; and an edition of Thomas Brasch's poetry. Most recently, he co-edited Arendt's conversations and correspondence with the eminent German historian and political essayist Joachim Fest. Additionally, he is a literary critic and cultural correspondent for the major German dailies Süddeutsche Zeitung andDer Tagesspiegel.

Hannah Arendt Center Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellows

  • Michiel Bot studied Law, Philosophy, and Cultural Analysis at the University of Amsterdam, and completed his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at New York University. His research and teaching interests include critical theory, political theory, law, literature, rhetoric, and postcolonial theory. His dissertation, “The Right to Offend,” challenges existing paradigms for adjudicating competing claims about “offensive” speech in contemporary politics and culture, by analyzing how giving offense and taking offense involve not only violations of abstract norms, but also identifications with those norms by concrete, antagonistic “subjects of offense.” This project seeks to intervene in current debates about free speech, secularism, democracy, literature, tolerance, multiculturalism, nationalism, and racism. His article, “The Right to Offend? Contested Speech Acts and Critical Democratic Practice” was published in the Summer 2012 issue of Law and Literature. He will be teaching in the Political Studies Program.
  • Charles Snyder studied philosophy at the New School for Social Research (PhD, 2014). His current writing addresses the relation between philosophy and political life in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, with particular interest in the philosophical schools of the Hellenistic period. He teaches broadly in the history of ancient philosophy, ancient tragic drama from Aeschylus to Seneca, and contemporary political theory. His dissertation was honored by the New School in the Spring of 2014 with the Hans Jonas Award in Philosophy, and his forthcoming publications include "The Socratic Benevolence of Arcesilaus' Dialectic" in the journal Ancient Philosophy. He will be a Teaching Fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative.

Klemens von Klemperer Hannah Arendt Center Post-Doctoral Fellow

  • Angela Maione holds a Ph.D. in Political Science/Political Theory from Northwestern University. Her dissertation, "Revolutionary Rhetoric," takes the rhetoricity of Wollstonecraft's political thought centrally to show that the two Vindications are both exemplary of the radical republican project of the Pamphlet War of the 1790s as well as a critique of it. The dissertation traces back to the former vitality of Wollstonecraft's democratic project­ of articulating the claim to political participation as the enabling condition of freedom in order to arrive at an historical understanding of democratic practice that offers unfamiliar reframings of contemporary debates in democratic theory around human rights, gender politics, and public debate. Angela Maione has presented numerous papers, including "Arendt, Wollstonecraft, and the Rights of Man." She will be teaching in the First-Year Seminar at Bard College. 


Hannah Arendt Center Associate Fellows

  • Aliza Becker has worked for three decades managing non-profit organizations related to peace and immigration education and activism. She is also an experienced educator and writer. She served as Executive Director of Brit Tzedek v'Shalom (in English, the Jewish Alliance for Justice and Peace) from its founding in 2002 until it joined J Street in 2010. At J Street, she served as the Special Projects Director. Aliza has degrees in History and Linguistics from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Illinois, and has studied at the Oral History Summer School.
  • Jeffrey Champlin received his BA from Middlebury College and Ph. D. from New York University. His teaching and research focuses on  connections between literature, philosophy, and political theory. Recent publications examine questions of power and aesthetics in Kleist, Goethe, Hegel, Rilke, and Arendt. He can be reached at jchampli@bard.edu.
  • Jennifer M. Hudson holds a PhD in political science (political theory) from Columbia University.  Her dissertation, “Bureaucratic Mentality: The Technocratization of Democratic Theory” addresses affinities and tensions between bureaucracy and democracy.  She critically engages with a current trend within democratic theory that aims to reconcile these two logics.  In her postdoctoral research, she will focus on the future of democratic legitimacy beyond the nation state, especially within Europe, with the goal of elaborating a post-national theory of democracy in opposition to technocratic governance projects.  Hudson has taught at Columbia College, Barnard College, Long Island University, the Columbia Summer High School Program, and Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. She will be teaching in the BPI Program.
  • Jeffrey Jurgens  received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is Fellow for Anthropology and Social Theory at the Bard Prison Initiative as well as Academic Co-Director of the Consortium for the Liberal Arts in Prison. His scholarly interests revolve around themes of migration, citizenship, youth culture, public memory, and the cultural politics of incarceration. His research focuses on migrants and post-migrants from Turkey in contemporary Berlin, and he has conducted language training and ethnographic fieldwork in Turkey as well. Jurgens’ writing has appeared in American Ethnologist, German Studies Review, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Policy and Society, and Transit, and one of his essays appears in the edited volume Walls, Borders, and Boundaries (Berghahn, 2012). He is currently at work on a book manuscript, “Postmigrant Pasts and Futures: Memory, Citizenship, and Pluralism in Germany.”
  • Ian Storey holds a Ph.D in Political Science from the University of Chicago. His dissertation-book manuscript, “The Taste of Politics: Kant’s aesthetics, judgment, and belonging in the Modern world” focused on the idea that Kant's theory of taste provided a unique ground for political critique by serving to connect everyday dynamics of individual social positioning which underlies any political community. His work interests more broadly include Late and post-Enlightenment German thought, practices and consequences of social embeddedness, and colonial histories.

Hannah Arendt Center Visiting Scholars

  • Ari-Elmeri Hyvönen is a PhD candidate in Politics at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. He received his Master of Social Sciences from the University of Tampere, Finland (2012). From 2012-2014, he worked as a visiting researcher at Tampere Peace Research Institute. His current research focuses on the worldly and temporal aspects of Arendt's thought as well as its relevance in the contemporary context-both political and theoretical. In addition to Arendt, he has written on American pragmatism, external perceptions of the Arab Spring, and 'resilience' in security-political thinking. His publications include: "Tentative Lessons of Experience: Arendt, Essayism, and 'the Social' Reconcidered" (Political Theory 42:5, 2014), "From Event to Process: The EU and the Arab Spring" (in della Porta and Mattoni, eds., Spreading Protest: Social Movements in Times of Crisis, ECPR Press 2014), as well as several articles and essays in Finnish.
  • Alfonso Ballesteros received his Master’s degree in Human Rights at the University of Valencia, Spain. He expects to complete his Ph. D. in Philosophy of Law and Politics at the University of la Coruña, Spain. His dissertation focuses in the tension between Politics and Law in Arendt’s thought. That is, the problem between the two main human concerns: the concern with the novelty of action and the concern with worldly stability. He teaches Theory of Law and Philosophy of Law at the University of la Coruña. He is also member of the ‘Constitution, Philosophy and Rationality’ Research Group.
  • Yasemin Sari is a PhD candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Alberta, Canada. Her dissertation, “Heidegger versus Arendt: A Recognitive Politics of Non/Violence and In/Visibility,” aims at constructing a theory of “recognitive politics” based on Hannah Arendt's understanding of political space. This theory of recognition examines the relationship between Arendt's conception of “the right to have rights” and the condition of visibility, in order to understand the condition of “artificial equality” in its spatial aspect.

2013-2014 Fellows


Hannah Arendt Center Senior Fellow

  • Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine. His writing also appears in The New York Review of Books, GQ, and The New Yorker. At Yale University Press, he is on the advisory board for the Margellos World Republic of Letters, an imprint devoted to world literature in translation. Modern Library publishes his translations of the complete works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. Yale will publish two of his translations of contemporary writer Pierre Michon in Fall 2013. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and a National Magazine Award in 2006. He has taught non-fiction writing in the MFA program of Bennington College, and has served as Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center at Bard College since 2010.

  • Robert Woodruff is one of the leading theater directors in the United States. He has directed over 60 productions across the U.S. at theatres including Lincoln Center Theater, Public Theater, Brooklyn Academy of Music, American Conservatory Theater, Guthrie Theater and Mark Taper Forum, among others. He will be a Senior Fellow at the Center for the fall 2013 semester, teaching a course entitled "Performing Arendt."

Hannah Arendt Center Research Associate

  • Thomas Wild,  a premiere Hannah Arendt scholar, is an Assistant Professor of German at Bard College. Dr. Wild studied German literature and culture as well as political science in Berlin, and Munich, where he received his Ph.D. He has taught at institutions of higher learning in Germany, at Vanderbilt University, and at Oberlin College.  Dr. Wild's research and teaching focus on twentieth-century German literature and film, the political dimensions of culture, art and thought, as well as contemporary developments in German media and society after 1989. Among his many publications are a monograph on Hannah Arendt's relationships with key postwar German writers such as Uwe Johnson, Ingeborg Bachmann, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Hilde Domin, and Rolf Hochhuth; an "intellectual biography" of Hannah Arendt; and an edition of Thomas Brasch's poetry. Most recently, he co-edited Arendt's conversations and correspondence with the eminent German historian and political essayist Joachim Fest. Additionally, he is a literary critic and cultural correspondent for the major German dailies Süddeutsche Zeitung andDer Tagesspiegel.

Hannah Arendt Center  Associate Fellow

  • Jeffrey Jurgens received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and he is Fellow for Anthropology and Social Theory at the Bard Prison Initiative as well as Associate Fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities. His scholarly interests revolve around themes of migration, citizenship, youth culture, public memory, and the cultural politics of incarceration. His research focuses on migrants and post-migrants from Turkey in contemporary Berlin, and he has conducted language training and ethnographic fieldwork in Turkey as well. Jurgens’ writing has appeared in American EthnologistGerman Studies ReviewJournal of Middle East Women’s Studies, and Policy and Society, and he has forthcoming contributions in the edited volume Walls, Borders, and Boundaries (Berghahn, 2012) and the journal Transit. He is also at work on a book manuscript, “Critical Contests: Immigration from Turkey and Liberal Citizenship in Germany.”
  • Jeffrey Champlin received his BA from Middlebury College and Ph. D. from New York University. His teaching and research focuses on  connections between literature, philosophy, and political theory. Recent publications examine questions of power and aesthetics in Kleist, Goethe, Hegel, Rilke, and Arendt. He can be reached at jchampli@bard.edu.
  • Ian Storey holds a Ph.D in Political Science from the University of Chicago. His dissertation-book manuscript, “The Taste of Politics: Kant’s aesthetics, judgment, and belonging in the Modern world” focused on the idea that Kant's theory of taste provided a unique ground for political critique by serving to connect everyday dynamics of individual social positioning which underlies any political community. His work interests more broadly include Late and post-Enlightenment German thought, practices and consequences of social embeddedness, and colonial histories.

Hannah Arendt Center Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow

  • Michiel Bot studied Law, Philosophy, and Cultural Analysis at the University of Amsterdam, and completed his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at New York University. His research and teaching interests include critical theory, political theory, law, literature, rhetoric, and postcolonial theory. His dissertation, “The Right to Offend,” challenges existing paradigms for adjudicating competing claims about “offensive” speech in contemporary politics and culture, by analyzing how giving offense and taking offense involve not only violations of abstract norms, but also identifications with those norms by concrete, antagonistic “subjects of offense.” This project seeks to intervene in current debates about free speech, secularism, democracy, literature, tolerance, multiculturalism, nationalism, and racism. His article, “The Right to Offend? Contested Speech Acts and Critical Democratic Practice” was published in the Summer 2012 issue of Law and Literature. He will be teaching in the Political Studies Program.
  • Wout Cornelissen  studied Philosophy at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, after which he earned his PhD in Political Philosophy at the Institute for Philosophy of Leiden University, the Netherlands. He spent the fall term of 2007 as a Visiting Scholar at the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. From 2009 onwards, he served as a Visiting Assistant Professor in Philosophy of Law at VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands. During the past few years, he taught, developed, and coordinated many different courses in the fields of Political Philosophy and Philosophy of Law. In his dissertation, titled “Politics between Philosophy and Polemics”, he develops an account of the conditions for political thinking and thoughtful politics through a comparative reading of the work of Karl Popper, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt. His research interests lie at the intersection of philosophy, politics, and literature. He is specifically interested in the relationship between philosophy and politics and between thinking and writing, as well as in the reception of ancient philosophy (especially Plato) in twentieth-century political thought. In June 2012, he participated in the conference on Arendt’s Denktagebuch organized by the Hannah Arendt Center. As a fellow of the Center, he plans to expand and deepen his research on Arendt’s political thinking by focusing especially on her last work, The Life of the Mind. He will be teaching in the Common Course program at Bard.
  • Jennifer M. Hudson holds a PhD in political science (political theory) from Columbia University.  Her dissertation, “Bureaucratic Mentality: The Technocratization of Democratic Theory” addresses affinities and tensions between bureaucracy and democracy.  She critically engages with a current trend within democratic theory that aims to reconcile these two logics.  In her postdoctoral research, she will focus on the future of democratic legitimacy beyond the nation state, especially within Europe, with the goal of elaborating a post-national theory of democracy in opposition to technocratic governance projects.  Hudson has taught at Columbia College, Barnard College, Long Island University, the Columbia Summer High School Program, and Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. She will be teaching in the BPI Program.

Hannah Arendt Center Visiting Scholars

  • Carlos A. Garduño Comparán is a Postdoctoral Fellow of the National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT), currently working on a project about different philosophical concepts of representation, from Hume and Kant, to Benjamin, Ricœur, Arendt, Foucault and Psychoanalysis. He received his Bachelor of Philosophy at the Iberoamerican University of Mexico City (UIA), graduating in 2004. He received his Master in Philosophy at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), graduating in 2009; and his Ph. D. in Philosophy at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), graduating in 2011. He has taught Philosophy of Communication, Ethics and Theory of Knowledge at Iberoamerican University, Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art at Monterrey Institute of Technology and Sociopolitical Ideas and Institutions at Mexico Autonomous Institute of Technology.  During the academic year 2012-2013, he visited the School of Graduate Studies in Social Sciences (EHESS) of Paris as a postdoctoral researcher. 
  • Melanie Challenger is a writer of poetry and non-fiction prose from the UK. Her first collection of poems, “Galatea”, received the Society of Authors’ Eric Gregory Award and nomination for the Forward Poetry Prize for Best First Collection. She was a Fellow at the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity at University College London until 2009 and Arts Council International Fellow for the British Antarctic Survey from 2007-8, for which she researched and wrote her non-fiction book, “On Extinction”, a meditation on the loss of biological and cultural diversity, which was chosen by Publishers Weekly as one of the best nonfiction books of 2012. Her research received a British Council Darwin Now Award. Previously, she co-authored “Stolen Voices” with Bosnian writer Zlata Filipovic, an epistolary history of twentieth-century conflict. Her current writing projects will explore questions of morality in a post-Darwinian world. 
  • Cristiana Grigore will be a visiting scholar at the Hannah Arendt Center in 2013. She is s a Fulbright scholar from Romania who recently finished her Masters in International Education Policies and Management at Vanderbilt University. During her Masters she used a multidisciplinary approach that included Business and Film Studies. Her thesis was about low status groups (such as minority ethnic groups, women, gay people and others) and what kind of contribution they can make to the globalized society of the 21st century. She herself belongs to such a group - the largest ethnic minority in Europe - the Roma people, commonly called Gypsies. She frequently writes or speaks about modern Roma. Her experiences has been featured in International Herald Tribune’s, CNN and Voice of America. Her latest article, “The Gypsy in Me” was published in the International Herald Tribune Global Agenda Magazine. Cristiana’s current work is exploring issues of modernity, the politics of identity, and the dynamics between low status groups and mainstream society.
  • Marc Holzenbecher - Marc Holzenbecher is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the Freie Universität Berlin and Fulbright visiting scholar at the Hannah Arendt Center in 2014. His research focuses the role of literature, particularly poetry, in Arendt’s political thought and examines the significance and function of the poetic element in regards to Arendt’s theory of political action. Marc Holzenbecher studied at Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po) and graduated in Political Science and Philosophy at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. He is co-founder and publisher of the biannual journal S T I L L, Magazine for New Literature & Photography. It features the work of established as well as up-and-coming authors and artists particularly from Germany and North America and promotes transatlantic exchange through readings and translation projects. 
  • Stefania Maffeis is a postdoctoral researcher currently working on the habilitation project "The Transnational Circulation of Knowledge in the Work and Reception of Hannah Arendt. USA/Germany 1951-2006" at the Department of Philosophy of the Freien Universitaet Berlin. In Parma, Italy, Stefania Maffeis studied Philosophy and the Humanities, graduating with a work on the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer and the social hermeneutics of Pierre Bourdieu. She moved to Berlin 2001 where she achieved a PhD in philosophy with a study on the history and the social conditions of philosophy in the former GDR, focusing the reception of Friedrich Nietzsche ("Zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik. Transformationen der DDR-Philosophie 1945-1993", Frankfurt a.M./New York: Campus, 2007). 

2012-2013 Fellows

Hannah Arendt Center Senior Fellow

  • Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine. His writing also appears in The New York Review of Books, GQ, and The New Yorker. At Yale University Press, he is consulting editor at large for the Margellos World Republic of Letters, an imprint devoted to world literature in translation. Modern Library publishes his translations of the complete works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and a National Magazine Award in 2006. He has taught non-fiction writing in the MFA program of Bennington College, and is Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center at Bard College for 2010-2013.

Hannah Arendt Center Research Associate

  • Thomas Wild,  a premiere Hannah Arendt scholar, is an Assistant Professor of German at Bard College. Dr. Wild studied German literature and culture as well as political science in Berlin, and Munich, where he received his Ph.D. He has taught at institutions of higher learning in Germany, at Vanderbilt University, and at Oberlin College.  Dr. Wild's research and teaching focus on twentieth-century German literature and film, the political dimensions of culture, art and thought, as well as contemporary developments in German media and society after 1989. Among his many publications are a monograph on Hannah Arendt's relationships with key postwar German writers such as Uwe Johnson, Ingeborg Bachmann, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Hilde Domin, and Rolf Hochhuth; an "intellectual biography" of Hannah Arendt; and an edition of Thomas Brasch's poetry. Most recently, he co-edited Arendt's conversations and correspondence with the eminent German historian and political essayist Joachim Fest. Additionally, he is a literary critic and cultural correspondent for the major German dailies Süddeutsche Zeitung and Der Tagesspiegel.

 Hannah Arendt Center  Associate Fellow

  • Jeffrey Jurgens received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and he is Fellow for Anthropology and Social Theory at the Bard Prison Initiative as well as Associate Fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities. His scholarly interests revolve around themes of migration, citizenship, youth culture, public memory, and the cultural politics of incarceration. His research focuses on migrants and post-migrants from Turkey in contemporary Berlin, and he has conducted language training and ethnographic fieldwork in Turkey as well. Jurgens’ writing has appeared in American EthnologistGerman Studies ReviewJournal of Middle East Women’s Studies, and Policy and Society, and he has forthcoming contributions in the edited volume Walls, Borders, and Boundaries (Berghahn, 2012) and the journal Transit. He is also at work on a book manuscript, “Critical Contests: Immigration from Turkey and Liberal Citizenship in Germany.”
  • Jeffrey Champlin received his BA from Middlebury College and Ph. D. from New York University. His teaching and research focuses on  connections between literature, philosophy, and political theory. Recent publications examine questions of power and aesthetics in Kleist, Goethe, Hegel, Rilke, and Arendt. He can be reached at jchampli@bard.edu


Hannah Arendt Center Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow


  •  Ian Storey who holds a Ph.D in Political Science from the University of Chicago will be a junior teaching fellow at the Center, teaching Political Science courses at Bard College. He has been teaching at the University of Chicago since 2009. His dissertation, “The Taste of Politics: Kant’s aesthetics, judgment, and belonging in the world” focused on the idea that Kant's theory of taste provided a unique ground for political critique by serving to connect everyday dynamics of individual social positioning which underlies any political community. He has a forthcoming article being published in Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice entitled, "Kant’s Dilemma and the Double Life of Citizenship.”
  • Grace Hunt completed her Ph.D in Philosophy from the New School of Social Research in New York in 2012. Her work focuses on Feminist Theory, 20th Century Continental Thought, Social and Political Philosophy. Her dissertation, "Affirmative Reactions: A Theory of Embodied Dignity" examines how the negative and reactive emotions so prevalent in testimonies of survivors can contribute to state-authorized reconciliation in a way that is morally empowering and politically productive for those survivors. Hunt is the author of an article entitled "Re-Enacting Dignity" published in the April, 2011 edition of Women in Philosophy Annual Journal of Papers.

Hannah Arendt Center Junior Fellows

  • John LeJeune will complete his Ph.D in Political Science from the University of California-San Diego in 2012. His work focuses on Political Theory and Comparative Politics. His dissertation, "Rise and Fall of the Councils: Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Revolution" looks at Arendt's ideas of the political in both a normative and a sociological perspective and applies those ideas to the concept of modern day revolution. LeJeune has two entries in the forthcoming 2012 Blackwell's Encyclopedia of Political Thought, and is the co-author of a 2009 article entitled, “Social Dynamics of Abandonment of Harmful Practices: A new look at the theory.”

Hannah Arendt Center Visiting Fellow

  • Cristiana Grigore will be a visiting fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center in 2013. She is s a Fulbright scholar from Romania who recently finished her Masters in International Education Policies and Management at Vanderbilt University. During her Masters she used a multidisciplinary approach that included Business and Film Studies. Her thesis was about low status groups (such as minority ethnic groups, women, gay people and others) and what kind of contribution they can make to the globalized society of the 21st century. She herself belongs to such a group - the largest ethnic minority in Europe - the Roma people, commonly called Gypsies. She frequently writes or speaks about modern Roma. Her experiences has been featured in International Herald Tribune’s, CNN and Voice of America. Her latest article, “The Gypsy in Me” was published in the International Herald Tribune Global Agenda Magazine. Cristiana’s current work is exploring issues of modernity, the politics of identity, and the dynamics between low status groups and mainstream society.

·            

2011-2012 Fellows

Hannah Arendt Center 2011-2012 Senior Fellow

  • Wyatt Mason is a contributing editor of Harper's Magazine and a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine. His writing also appears in The New York Review of Books and The New Yorker. Modern Library publishes his translations of the works of Arthur Rimbaud, Rimbaud Complete and I Promise to be Good. A 2003-2004 fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation from the National Book Critics Circle and a National Magazine Award in 2006. He teaches non-fiction in the Bennington Writing Seminars.

Hannah Arendt Center 2011-2012  Postdoctoral Fellows

  • Jeffrey Champlin completed his Ph.D. from NYU in 2011 in German Languages and Literature.  His work focuses on German literature, political theory, and aesthetics. In his dissertation, Jeff draws on the theoretical writings of Arendt and literary texts by Goethe, Schiller, and Kleist to examine questions of violence and political representation. 
    He has a book manuscript, The Making of a Terrorist: Classic German Rogues, which is currently under contract with Northwestern University Press and is the editor of the forthcoming volume Terror and the Roots of Poetics. He will be teaching in the FYSEM program.  Email Jeff at  jchampli@bard.edu.  
  • Jennie Han expects to complete her PhD. candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago in July, 2011. Her dissertation—“The Phenomenology of Responsibility”—turns to Hannah Arendt to develop a language for individual moral responsibility in modern bureaucratic institutions. Jennie Han is a graduate of Yale University, Yale Law School, and Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. She will be teaching in the Bard Prison Initiative. 

Hannah Arendt Center 2011-2012 Associate Fellow

  • Jeffrey Jurgens received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and he is Fellow for Anthropology and Social Theory at the Bard Prison Initiative as well as Associate Fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities. His scholarly interests revolve around themes of migration, citizenship, youth culture, public memory, and the cultural politics of incarceration. His research focuses on migrants and post-migrants from Turkey in contemporary Berlin, and he has conducted language training and ethnographic fieldwork in Turkey as well. Jurgens’ writing has appeared in American EthnologistGerman Studies ReviewJournal of Middle East Women’s Studies, and Policy and Society, and he has forthcoming contributions in the edited volume Walls, Borders, and Boundaries (Berghahn, 2012) and the journal Transit. He is also at work on a book manuscript, “Critical Contests: Immigration from Turkey and Liberal Citizenship in Germany.”


Hannah Arendt Center 2011-2012 Visiting Fellows


  • Kieran Bonner Kieran Bonner is Professor of Sociology, Chair of Sociology and Legal Studies and Director of the Human Sciences minor at St. Jerome’s University in the University of Waterloo, and Associate Chair Graduate Studies, Sociology at the University of Waterloo. He was a co-investigator on the Culture of Cities: Montreal Toronto Berlin Dublin SSHRC project and Chair of its Executive Committee from 2000 - 2005. He is currently a co-investigator on the interdisciplinary research project, City Life and Well-Being: the Grey Zone of Health and Illness, funded by the Canadian Institute of Health Research, 2006 – 2011. 
  • Solveig Botnen Eide Solveig Botnen Eide is a postdoctoral fellow in ethics at the University of Agder, Norway. Her education is in social work and theology, with a doctorate in ethics. As well as teaching and research, she is interested in ethics with special regards to professional ethics and ethical challenges in the welfare sectors. She is working with a phenomenological approach to moral philosophy, with a new and increased interest for the work of Hannah Arendt. 
  • Jacob Dahl Rendtorff (born 1965) is Associate Professor of Business Ethics at Roskilde University, Denmark. Rendtorff is Head of Studies and Head of Research for the research group on business, leadership and change of his department. Rendtorff has a background in ethics, business ethics, bioethics, political theory and philosophy of law. Rendtorff has written seven books on issues concerning existentialism and hermeneutics, French philosophy, ethics, bioethics and business ethics, philosophy of law and business, and he has been co-author and editor on more than ten other books. 

Hannah Arendt Center 2011-2012 Visiting Scholar in Residence

  • Victor Granado Almena (born 1983) expects to complete his Ph.D in Political and contemporary Philosophy at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he is teaching as Pre-doctoral Fellow. His dissertation, called Out of place: a philosophical reflection about displacement and the displaced people in the global age, turns to Hannah Arendt to develop a new perspective in order to understand better the notion of citizenship in a global age. He is the recipient of a research grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education. With the help of that grant he will  study in a few places other than the Arendt Center during his research: the first, at the Freie Universität Berlin under the direction of Dr. Wolfgang Heuer in 2009, and the second, at the Univertité Paris 7 – Denis Diderot under the direction of Dr. Etienne Tassin in 2010.

Past Fellows

2009-2010, 2010-2011 

In 2010-2011 Arendt Center Fellows and Visiting Scholars included:
  • Charles (Bill) Dixon (Post-Doctoral Fellow) is a political theorist and a PhD. candidate in Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. Dixon’s research interests include ancient and modern theories of democracy, political judgment and action, political economy, and ontological problems in social science. He is currently working on a project on the politics of capitalist globalization and global warming. 

  • Laura Ephraim (Post-Doctoral Fellow) recently finished her PhD in Political Science at Northwestern University. Her research scrutinizes several iconic texts from the origins of modern science in order to reopen a question that Hannah Arendt posed in The Human Condition, among other works: namely, what is the role of science in a democratic society? While at the Arendt Center, Laura will begin work on a book manuscript to extend the themes of her dissertation and will teach in the Language & Thinking Program and the First Year Seminar.

  • Ursula Ludz (Visiting Scholar) is editor of Letters: 1925-1975 by Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger and Arendt’s Denktagebuch among other publications. She will be in residence at the Center in the Fall, 2010.

In 2009-2010 Arendt Center Fellows and Visiting Scholars included:

  • Eveline Cioflec recently completed her doctoral thesis at the University of Freiburg in Germany (“The Concept Zwischen (In-Between)”). She is currently teaching at the New Europe College Institute of Advanced Studies, Bucharest. She will visit the Arendt Center as a Fulbright scholar.  She will be in residence at the Arendt Center during the academic year 2009-2010.
     
  • Silvia Zappulla is a doctoral student from the classics department at the University of Siena. She will be working on her doctoral dissertation on the relationship between greek tragedy and the development of the political thought of Hannah Arendt. She will be in residence at the Center in Fall, 2009.
     
  • Hans Teerds is an architect, urban designer, and writer based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.  He is editor of the peer-reviewed bilingual Dutch/English architectural journal OASE.    He is also a research fellow of the department of ‘Public Building’ of the Faculty of Architecture at Delft University of Technology. And he is editor (with Tom Avermaete and Klaske Havik) of Architectural Positions: Architecture, Modernity and the Public Sphere, Amsterdam 2009, SUN Publishers.  
  • Hiroshi Murai (Visiting scholar) is Professor of Political Theory  at the University of Shimane in Hamada, Japan. His specialization is political philosophy and the work of Hannah Arendt. He has published numerous books, most recently: Nishi Amane and Modernity in Japan (Pelican-sha 2005).