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A webcast of the Trinity Conference, "Religion & Violence: Untangling the Roots of Conflict An Interfaith Dialogue," for those members and friends of the IAT who do not have internet access, is offered on Tuesday, January 22, and Wednesday, January, 23, 2008, in room 202 of the F. W. Olin Humanities Building, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day. Lunch and refreshments are available to purchase in the Bertelsmann Campus Center's "Down the Road Cafe."

Please note there will be no webcast at Bard on Monday, January 21 (Martin Luther King Day), however you can view this on any computer with an internet connection (see Trinity Institute website).

IAT member Betsy Hamilton, who requested the simulcast, says that"last year we had a lively discussion after each session of the conference webcast and hope to be able to this again this year." 

A detailed program and schedule is available online at the Trinity Institute website. This is the second year that we have been able to offer this simulcast, at the request of IAT member Betsy Hamilton, and we would like to thank the Trinity Institute for their help with this.

From the Trinity Institute website:

Religion & Violence:
Untangling the Roots of Conflict An Interfaith Dialogue

While people of faith raise prayers for peace, stories of religiously fueled violence fill the news. Critics question whether the world can afford to tolerate a force as destructive as religion. Is violence an inescapable result of religious commitment, or is it a distortion, a human projection on a God in whom there is no violence? Is it the sole province of extremists, or do the roots of conflict touch all persons of faith?

Do solutions to these seemingly intractable problems lie within the traditions themselves? Through keynote presentations and small group theological reflection, this interfaith gathering will provide opportunities to deepen understanding, build community, and explore how religion can be a powerful force for peace within ourselves, our families, our communities, and the world. The conference will begin on the day we honor Martin Luther King, Jr., to ask how we can take up his legacy of faithful nonviolence in our time.

Our distinguished keynote speakers and preacher are skilled theologians who are also prominent public intellectuals -- Christian, Jewish, and Muslim. They will:

  • Explore how all three traditions become entangled with violence
  • Illuminate the resources within the traditions for living together in peace, without losing our unique identities

Click on any photo for a full biography.

Religion & Violence: Untangling the Roots of Conflict will be held at Trinity Church in New York City.

The conference presentations will also be telecast live online and available on demand following the conference.