From the Director

One of the questions we’re most frequently asked is, “Which workshop should I take first?” Since teachers come to IWT workshops from a range of schools, professional development experiences, and backgrounds in composition, my answer is almost always, “That depends.” Generally, though, workshop participants should know that Writing and Thinking and Writing to Learn are IWT’s two basic workshops from which all other workshops derive.

Writing and Thinking inspires and informs workshops that focus on different aspects of the composing process, paying attention to genre, the uses and kinds of informal writing to generate texts—Inquiry into Essay, or Fiction: Memory and Imagination, for example. Teachers of English, language arts, composition, creative writing, or creative non-fiction will find the workshops in this group especially useful. And although our workshops are developed primarily for teachers, anyone looking for an opportunity to write in the company of others through guided assignments is welcome to register for these workshops.

Writing to Learn is actually the first in a series of workshops that consider how to make writing central to teaching and learning—when content takes priority and time is limited. As the basic workshop in this series, Writing to Learn explores diverse practices that can be used in the classroom or in homework assignments and serves as an introduction to teaching through writing in all academic fields. The particular interests of IWT associates and requests from teachers have generated other workshops in this category, such as Human Rights: A Writing to Learn Workshop, Thinking Historically through Writing, and Revolutionary Grammar.

In both cases, though, workshop leaders leave time to explore how you might apply these practices to the real world of the classroom, with your students, at the level you teach, and in your academic discipline. As important will be the opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences with other teachers. Workshop participants form a teaching/learning community within workshops and it is not unusual to find in one section teachers of 6th grade social studies, 11th grade AP history, and graduate religious studies. Hearing each other’s writing and responses to common readings is a vital part of the workshop experience and it’s this interaction that can suggest and demonstrate new approaches to teaching through writing. IWT believes that as teachers become reflective practitioners through their own writing, they are more able to collaborate and learn from each other. It is this reflective process that guides us as teachers to lead students to discover rather than just setting out to find answers.

We hope to see you at a workshop soon.

Peg Peoples
Annandale-on-Hudson

From the Director

quotation markA writer is a person whose best is released in the accomplishment of writing—perhaps it is a good variant to say—in the act of writing. He does not necessarily think these things—he does not, that is, think them out and then write them down: he writes and the best of him, in spite of his thought, will appear on the page even to his surprise, unrecognized or even sometimes against his will, by the proper use of words.quotation mark

—William Carlos Williams

One of the questions we’re most frequently asked is, “Which workshop should I take first?” Since teachers come to IWT workshops from a range of schools, professional development experiences, and backgrounds in composition, my answer is almost always, “That depends.” Generally, though, workshop participants should know that Writing and Thinking and Writing to Learn are IWT’s two basic workshops from which all other workshops derive.

Writing and Thinking inspires and informs workshops that focus on different aspects of the composing process, paying attention to genre, the uses and kinds of informal writing to generate texts—Inquiry into Essay, or Fiction: Memory and Imagination, for example. Teachers of English, language arts, composition, creative writing, or creative non-fiction will find the workshops in this group especially useful. And although our workshops are developed primarily for teachers, anyone looking for an opportunity to write in the company of others through guided assignments is welcome to register for these workshops.

Writing to Learn is actually the first in a series of workshops that consider how to make writing central to teaching and learning—when content takes priority and time is limited. As the basic workshop in this series, Writing to Learn explores diverse practices that can be used in the classroom or in homework assignments and serves as an introduction to teaching through writing in all academic fields. The particular interests of IWT associates and requests from teachers have generated other workshops in this category, such as Human Rights: A Writing to Learn Workshop, Thinking Historically through Writing, and Revolutionary Grammar.

In both cases, though, workshop leaders leave time to explore how you might apply these practices to the real world of the classroom, with your students, at the level you teach, and in your academic discipline. As important will be the opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences with other teachers. Workshop participants form a teaching/learning community within workshops and it is not unusual to find in one section teachers of 6th grade social studies, 11th grade AP history, and graduate religious studies. Hearing each other’s writing and responses to common readings is a vital part of the workshop experience and it’s this interaction that can suggest and demonstrate new approaches to teaching through writing. IWT believes that as teachers become reflective practitioners through their own writing, they are more able to collaborate and learn from each other. It is this reflective process that guides us as teachers to lead students to discover rather than just setting out to find answers.

We hope to see you at a workshop soon.

Peg Peoples
Annandale-on-Hudson