Writing Based Teaching

Writing Based Teaching: Essential Practices and Enduring Questions (SUNY Press, available November 2009) is a response to teachers’ requests for guidance in how to make writing a central part of their pedagogy. By guidance, we understand conversations with writers and teachers who have traveled the same road from “strategy to practice,” keeping in mind the questions, “how can I change?” “What classroom culture will support that change?”

The question implied in the book's eight chapters is “Why write?” What difference does writing make in teaching, learning, and in the community of school? Questions about how to teach are not new, but the weight that teachers give to writing suggests not only that literacy is has become a more pressing problem, but that writing is valued for the ways in which it enriches and enlivens thinking. Writing-based teaching, described in different ways in these chapters, slows us down and makes us better listener and readers of others’ texts and of our own, and more reflective teachers.

Taken together, the essays represent an intellectual and pedagogical map through the composing process and the uses of writing to learn. The final chapter tells the story of IWT. Writing, the importance of community and collaboration, and IWT’s history are intertwined with the term practice.

To order a copy, visit: http://www.sunypress.edu/details.asp?id=61912 or contact the Program Administrator of IWT, at iwtregistration@bard.edu or 845.758.7484.

Writing Based Teaching

quotation markThe question implied in the book’s eight chapters is “Why write?”  What difference does writing make in teaching, learning, and in the community of school? quotation mark

—Teresa Vilardi, editor

Writing Based Teaching: Essential Practices and Enduring Questions (SUNY Press, available November 2009) is a response to teachers’ requests for guidance in how to make writing a central part of their pedagogy. By guidance, we understand conversations with writers and teachers who have traveled the same road from “strategy to practice,” keeping in mind the questions, “how can I change?” “What classroom culture will support that change?”

The question implied in the book's eight chapters is “Why write?” What difference does writing make in teaching, learning, and in the community of school? Questions about how to teach are not new, but the weight that teachers give to writing suggests not only that literacy is has become a more pressing problem, but that writing is valued for the ways in which it enriches and enlivens thinking. Writing-based teaching, described in different ways in these chapters, slows us down and makes us better listener and readers of others’ texts and of our own, and more reflective teachers.

Taken together, the essays represent an intellectual and pedagogical map through the composing process and the uses of writing to learn. The final chapter tells the story of IWT. Writing, the importance of community and collaboration, and IWT’s history are intertwined with the term practice.

To order a copy, visit: http://www.sunypress.edu/details.asp?id=61912 or contact the Program Administrator of IWT, at iwtregistration@bard.edu or 845.758.7484.

Writing Based Teaching: Essential Practices and Enduring Questions

Teresa Vilardi and Mary Chang, editors. SUNY Press, November 2009.

Preface: Leon Botstein

Introduction: Teresa Vilardi

Chapter One: A Case for Private Freewriting in the Classroom
—Sharon Marshall

Chapter Two: Focused Freewriting: How to Do Things with Writing Prompts
—Nicole B. Wallack

Chapter Three: Process Writing: Reflection and the Arts of Writing and Teaching
—Alfred E. Guy Jr.

Chapter Four: Odd Questions, Strange Texts, and Other People: Collaborative Learning, Play, and New Knowledge
—Alice Lesnick

Chapter Five: Dialectical Notebooks
—Margaret Ranny Bledsoe

Chapter Six: Radical Revision: Toward Demystifying the Labor of Writing
—Carley Moore

Chapter Seven: Learning Culture: Writing in Community
—Robert D. Whittemore

Chapter Eight: To Write and Think in the Community of School
—Ray Peterson

Postscript: Community and Collaboration: The Workshop in Language and Thinking and the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College
—Teresa Vilardi