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Levy Economics Institute and Economics Program present

Economic Seminar Series

Friday, May 2, 2014

DETERMINANTS OF IMMIGRATION HOMEOWNERSHIP: EXAMINING THEIR CHANGING ROLE DURING THE GREAT RECESSION AND BEYOND

By
Kusum Mundra

Rutgers University Newark 

The Great Recession had significant economic effects both in the U.S. and around the world. There is a great deal of evidence that homeownership rates declined during this period, though some immigrants were less severely affected than natives. This paper investigates factors that reduced the vulnerability of immigrants in the face of the economic crisis and increased the likelihood of homeownership. Specifically, it examines the extent to which birthplace networks, savings, length of stay in the U.S., and citizenship status affected the probability of homeownership before the recession and the extent to which these impacts changed since the recession. Using data from Current Population Survey for the years 2000 – 2012, we find that birthplace networks have a significant influence on homeownership and the importance of the factor has increased since the onset of recession. Moreover, the impact of birthplace networks on homeownership is stronger for citizens and immigrants who have not arrived recently. We also find a decline in the impact of saving and length of stay on the probability of homeownership during 2007-2012 compared to earlier years. In contrast, we find an increase in the impact of being a citizen on immigrant homeownership during this period.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kusum Mundra is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Rutgers University Newark. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Riverside and an M.A. from Delhi School of Economics. Her research interests lie in issues of immigration, gender, terrorism and conflict, and econometrics. She has worked on issues ranging from the effect of immigrant networks and immigrant diasporas on trade, role of social networks on immigrant earnings, access to healthcare for immigrant women, empirical investigation of suicide bombing events and semiparametric panel data estimation. Her current research includes gender pay gap in the U.S., immigrant housing in the U.S. and Spain, role of immigrant networks in conflict, immigrant assimilation and trade creation, and nonparametric panel data estimation. Her research has been published in major economics journals including the American Economic Review, Demography, Journal of International Trade and Economic Development, Terrorism and Political Violence, the Handbook of Applied Econometrics and Statistical Inferences, and the Frontiers of Economics and Globalization – Migration and Culture 

This talk is part of the ongoing Economics seminar series, which is dedicated to furthering the exchange of economic ideas in the greater Bard community.



For more information, call 845-758-7075, or e-mail tchernev@bard.edu.

Location: Hegeman 102