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BARD’S INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED THEOLOGY PRESENTS A FREE CONFERENCE IN APRIL THAT EXPLORES HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE IN ANTIQUITY “Historical Knowledge in Graeco-Roman, Judaic, and Christian Antiquity: What Kinds of Questions Can We Answer?” is a three-day program April 25–27

Emily M. Darrow
845-758-7512
darrow@bard.edu
04-25-2006
ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, N.Y.—The Institute of Advanced Theology (IAT) at Bard College and the Office of the Dean of the College present a three-day conference, “Historical Knowledge in Graeco-Roman, Judaic, and Christian Antiquity: What Kinds of Questions Can We Answer?,” from Tuesday, April 25, through Thursday, April 27. Free and open to the public, the program will be held in the Weis Cinema of the Bertelsmann Campus Center. No reservations are necessary. Organized by Bard professors Bruce Chilton, Carolyn Dewald, and Jacob Neusner, along with William Scott Green of the University of Rochester, the conference is designed in conjunction with a course offered at Bard this semester by professors Chilton and Neusner. Following on the success of similarly designed programs—“Altruism in World Religions” (2004) and “Religious Foundations of Western Civilization” (2003–04), which resulted in books of the same titles, published, by Georgetown University Press (2005) and Abingdon Press (2006), respectively, this conference is expected to be available in a similar volume in the future. Participants include Alan J. Avery-Peck, Kraft-Hiatt Professor in Judaic Studies and chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the College of the Holy Cross; Bruce Chilton, Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Philosophy and Religion, executive director of the IAT, and Chaplain of the College at Bard; Carolyn Dewald, professor of classical and historical studies at Bard; William Scott Green, Dean of the College, Philip S. Bernstein Professor of Judaic Studies, and professor of religion at the University of Rochester; Jacob Neusner, Research Professor of Religion and Theology and Senior Fellow of the IAT at Bard; G. W. E. Nickelsburg, professor emeritus of religion at the University of Iowa; Gary G. Porton, Charles and Sarah Drobny Professor of Talmudic Studies and Judaism in the Program for the Study of Religion, University of Illinois at Urbana-Chamapign; and Lawrence H. Schiffman, Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, director of undergraduate studies, and chairman, Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, New York University. Each presentation of the conference features, as respondents, a Bard student who is currently enrolled in Professor Neusner’s and Chilton’s course on historical knowledge in antiquity. The Institute of Advanced Theology was established to foster critical understanding based on scholarship, which aims to make true religious pluralism possible. Since its inception in 1996, the Institute’s work has focused on how religions influence history, society, and other religions, and are in turn influenced by them. The Institute gratefully acknowledges support from members of the Institute, the Crohn Family Trust, and Tisch Family Foundation, as well as grants from The Levy Economics Institute and Bard College. For further information, call the IAT at 845-758-7279, e-mail iat@bard.edu, or visit the website www.bard.edu/iat. # Institute of Advanced Theology Conference Schedule Historical Knowledge in Graeco-Roman, Judaic, and Christian Antiquity: What Kinds of Questions Can We Answer? Organized by Bard professors Bruce Chilton, Carolyn Dewald, and Jacob Neusner, along with William Scott Green of the University of Rochester Tuesday, April 25, through Thursday, April 27 Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center All events are free and open to the public Bard students preside at each session, asking the first question during the discussion period. Tuesday, April 25 1:00–1:15 p.m.—Greeting by Michèle Dominy, dean of Bard College HISTORY-WRITING AS A CULTURAL PROGRAM 1:15–2:30 p.m.—The Tasks of History in Ancient Israel, Bruce Chilton, Bard College; student presiding, Jordan Bielsky 2:30–4:00 p.m.—The Tasks of History in Ancient Greece: Herodotus, Carolyn Dewald, Bard College; student presiding, Emily Tersoff THE NATURE AND LIMITS OF HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE PROBLEMS OF ANCIENT JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY 4:00–5:30 p.m.—History-Writing in the Dead Sea Library, Lawrence H. Schiffman, New York University; student presiding, Barnaby Alter 7:00–8:30 p.m.—History-Writing in, and on the Basis of, Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, G. W. E. Nickelsburg, University of Iowa; student presiding, Lisa Dratch Wednesday, April 26 9:00–10:30 a.m.—The Idea of History in Rabbinic Judaism: What Kinds of Questions Did the Ancient Rabbis Answer?, Jacob Neusner, Bard College; student presiding, Ben Copulsky 10:30 a.m. – 12 noon—Interpreting Legal History in the Mishnaic Division of Agriculture, Alan J. Avery-Peck, College of the Holy Cross; student presiding, Amelia Craig SPECIAL PROBLEMS OF HISTORY-WRITING IN ANCIENT CHRISTIANITY AND JUDAISM 1:00–2:30 p.m.—In Search of Jesus: Issues of Personality and Character, Bruce Chilton, Bard College; student presiding, Tyler Dusenbury 2:30–4:00 p.m.—Reconstructing James, Bruce Chilton, Bard College; student presiding, Jason Tarkington 4:00–5:30 p.m.—Biography and Theology: The Unfolding of Paul's Life and Thought, Bruce Chilton, Bard College; student presiding, Alanna Glassman 7:00–8:30 p.m.—What Kind of Historical Writing Does Archaeology Sustain in Ancient Judaism, William Scott Green, University of Rochester; student presiding, Anastazyia Vareschi Thursday, April 27 9:00–10:00 a.m.—Mary of Magdala, Bruce Chilton, Bard College; student presiding, Joseph Geagan 10:00–11:00 a.m.—Historical Questions and Questioning History: Studying Judaism in Late Antiquity, Gary G. Porton, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; student presiding, Alana Siegel 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.—Epilogue, William Scott Green, University of Rochester; student presiding, Tom Hillman

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This event was last updated on 04-27-2006