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Press Release

BARD SUMMERSCAPE 2005 SEASON ANNOUNCEMENT “AARON COPLAND AND HIS WORLD” IS THE GUIDING SPIRIT OF SUMMERSCAPE 2005 AND THE FOCUS OF THE 16TH ANNUAL BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL ON THE BARD CAMPUS IN NEW YORK’S HISTORIC HUDSON VALLEY

Mark Primoff
845-758-7412
primoff@bard.edu
07-08-2005

THIRD ANNUAL BARD SUMMERSCAPE FESTIVAL FEATURES SEVEN WEEKS OF WIDE-RANGING PERFORMING ARTS PRESENTATIONS,
JULY 8 to AUGUST


HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
MARC BLITZSTEIN’S OPERA REGINA; CLIFFORD ODETS’S PLAY ROCKET TO THE MOON; AARON COPLAND’S OPERA THE TENDER LAND; THE MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY; A WEEKEND OF JAZZ; AN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL; A CONCERT PERFORMANCE OF BROADWAY’S THE GOLDEN APPLE; AND THE POPULAR “NIGHTSCAPE” SERIES


World-renowned Bard Music Festival to feature concerts, panel discussions, and preconcert talks focusing on the public and private Copland, politics, culture, and music, with the American Symphony Orchestra in residence

“Brave and brainy” – Newsday

“Seven weeks of cultural delight” – International Herald Tribune


Annandale-on-Hudson N.Y., March 14, 2005 – The third annual SummerScape Festival at Bard College will open on July 8, 2005, with three of Martha Graham’s most famous creations set to music by three of the 20th century’s greatest composers: Appalachian Spring, to Aaron Copland’s immortal score; Cave of the Heart, to music by Samuel Barber; and Hérodiade, scored by Paul Hindemith.

Bard SummerScape’s exploration of great mid-20th-century American performing arts continues throughout the summer with two major operas; an important but rarely performed play; the world renowned Bard Music Festival, dedicated this year to Aaron Copland and His World; a film festival, William Wyler’s America; and cabaret and jazz concert performances. Clifford Odets’s 1938 Broadway play Rocket to the Moon, Marc Blitzstein’s searing three-act opera Regina, and Aaron Copland’s only full-length opera, The Tender Land are three operatic and theatrical presentations that highlight SummerScape’s dazzling mix of performing arts offerings.

The 16th annual Bard Music Festival, “Aaron Copland and His World,” will take place over two concentrated three-day weekends, August 12-14 and 19-21. A rich and extensive mix of concerts, panel discussions, and preconcert talks – spanning 11 themed programs – will explore the enduring legacy of one of America’s most influential and beloved composers. The American Symphony Orchestra will be in residence for symphonic and orchestral performances, as well as for Regina, The Tender Land, and the Martha Graham Dance Company.

Over a period of seven weeks, SummerScape will focus on American performing arts of “the American Century.” During the period from the Great Depression through the postwar boom, America was the stage as well as the mirror of world events – cultural as well as economic and political – whose effects continue today, although the period’s importance is sometimes overlooked as “passé.” Bard SummerScape will provide an opportunity to examine an extraordinary and entertaining array of mid-century American performing arts.

“Mid-Twentieth-Century American Culture and Politics,” the topic of a symposium during the Bard Music Festival, well describes the interplay between arts and world events in the central third of the American Century and one of its focal points, Aaron Copland. The composer was not only an outstanding American symbol of his time, but the linchpin for a circle of artists working in many forms. He worked with several film directors, including William Wyler. Wyler filmed an adaptation of an infamous play by Lillian Hellman titled The Little Foxes, which itself was transformed by Copland’s contemporary Marc Blitzstein into his powerful opera Regina. Another famous playwright of the day, Clifford Odets,leaped to the forefront of American theater with his 1938 play Rocket to the Moon and was part of New York’s left-leaning Group Theater. And one of the most famous collaborations in American artistic history was that of Copland and Martha Graham for their ballet Appalachian Spring. But Graham also worked with many other composers who were part of the mid-century scene: Samuel Barber and the German expatriate Paul Hindemith wrote music for the other two Graham dances that will open SummerScape this year.

As in the two previous years, SummerScape will also present a related major film retrospective, this year focusing on William Wyler, whose film The Heiress was scored by Copland. Related or contemporary films by other great directors, some with scores by Copland and Virgil Thomson, will also be screened.

New to SummerScape this year will be jazz performances by Vince Giordano and his Nighthawks and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra. The popular late-night Nightscape cabaret series continues with appearances by Ann Carlson, the Flying Neutrinos, the Hungry March Band, and Gloria Deluxe. Bard SummerScape 2005 will conclude with a concert presentation of the classic Broadway musical, The Golden Apple, on Sunday, August 28, performed by the American Symphony Orchestra, with Jonathan Tunick conducting. This work, with music by Jerome Moross and book and lyrics by John LaTouche, is a retelling of the Iliad and the Odyssey that won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best musical of 1954.

Described by the Los Angeles Times as “the most important American festival since Lincoln Center started its summer festival,” Bard SummerScape also features one of America’s most talked-about concert venues, the Frank Gehry-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, set in a glorious expanse of the Hudson Valley. A critic for the New Yorker called it “what may be the best small concert hall in the United States”; a reporter for Vanity Fair added, “The rippling steel forms – Gehry’s trademark of late – create an exhilarating, otherworldly counterpoint to the pastoral surroundings.”

OPERA
Acclaimed soprano Lauren Flanigan takes the title role in Regina (opening July 29), a landmark American opera by Copland’s contemporary Marc Blitzstein, whose centennial is celebrated this year. Peter Schneider (producer of The Lion King) directs the opera, with sets designed by celebrated installation artist Judy Pfaff (recipient of a 2004 MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” and Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Professor in the Arts). Regina is Blitzstein’s adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s play, The Little Foxes (William Wyler’s film version will also be shown at Bard), and it tells the story of a ruthless matriarch and her unscrupulous family in the South at the turn of the 20th century. Blitzstein wrote in 1935, “It is clear to me that the conception of music in society…is dying of acute anachronism; and that a fresh idea, overwhelming in its implications and promise, is taking hold. Music must have a social as well as artistic base; it should broaden its scope and reach not only the select few but the masses.” Leonard Bernstein, younger than Blitzstein by only 3 years, wrote of the opera, “With Regina we have a kind of apex, a summation of what Blitzstein has been trying to do. The words sing themselves, so to speak. The result is true song a long, flexible, pragmatic, dramatic song.” The American Symphony Orchestra will be conducted by its music director, Leon Botstein. (Five performances between July 29 and August 6; tickets $65, $50 and $35.)

The major work by Aaron Copland scheduled for Bard SummerScape is his only opera, The Tender Land (1954), in a chamber version conducted by James Bagwell and directed by Erica Schmidt, opening on August 4. Copland drew inspiration for the three-act work (given its premiere by the New York City Opera) from James Agee and Walker Evans’s powerful Depression-era essay with photographs titled Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Folk materials and country dances evoke rural life. (Six performances between August 4 -12; tickets $35.)

THEATER
Clifford Odets’s Rocket to the Moon was credited by the play’s original director, Harold Clurman, as containing the playwright’s most brilliant writing: “Love, in its broadest sense, is a constant in all Odets’s writing, the very root of his talent.” Part social criticism, part romance, the play is as universally poignant today as when it was written and first acclaimed on Broadway in 1938. Daniel Fish directs. Odets (1906-1963), the son of Jewish immigrants, was born in Philadelphia and helped form the Group Theater in New York, still considered one of the most influential theatrical undertakings in American history. Members held left-wing political views and wanted to produce plays that dealt with important social issues; Sanford Meisner, Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg were among Odets’s associates.(Seven performances between
July 14-24; tickets $35.)


DANCE
New to SummerScape this season, dance is represented by the Martha Graham Dance Company on opening night, July 8, 2005. The Graham company is the oldest and most influential dance company in America, and “one of the greatest companies of the world,” according to the New York Times. The three dances the Company will perform come from the 1940s, arguably Graham’s greatest period. Two are among her most famous, the third a genuine rarity. Graham (1894-1991) tapped the rural roots she acquired on her grandmother’s Pennsylvania farm, inspiring Aaron Copland to compose one of the best-loved works of 20th-century American music. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Appalachian Spring, premiered in Washington in 1944, will be accompanied by a dramatic reading of Graham/Copland correspondence by the noted actress and Bard alumna Blythe Danner. Graham reminisced about the ballet’s creation in Blood Memories: “Aaron …said to me, ‘Martha, what have you named the ballet?’ And when I told him he asked, ‘Does it have anything to do with the ballet?’ ‘No’, I said, ‘I just like the title.’”

Graham’s 1947 ballet Cave of the Heart, to Samuel Barber’s music, is based on the Medea legend, one of many Graham dances based on mythology or history. Hérodiade, the least known of these three works, is about the infamous mother of the Biblical Salome, and was set to music by Paul Hindemith (which was based, in turn, on French symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé’s 1896 work). The American Symphony Orchestra will perform, conducted by Aaron Sherber.(Three performances, July 8, 9 & 10; tickets $55, $40, $25.)

FILM
“William Wyler’s America” takes a look at some of the major works of Aaron Copland’s contemporary and one-time collaborator (for The Heiress, whose score won the Academy Award in 1950). The festival will screen more than 15 films by American directors, many featuring soundtracks by Copland or Virgil Thomson. William Wyler’s Dodsworth (1936), Come and Get It (1936), The Westerner, (1940), Jezebel (1938), The Little Foxes (1941), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), The Heiress (1949) and the little known Memphis Belle: The Story of a Flying Fortress (1940) are the kernel of the festival, and will be given the full-screen treatment so rare in the day of DVDs and surround-sound blockbusters. This festival is a feast for Bette Davis fans, among others. Other films to be screened are The Red Pony, The Plow that Broke the Plains, Of Mice and Men, and The River. Wyler, born in Alsace in 1902, was a multiple Oscar-winner famed for his insecurity and the number of takes he demanded of his actors. Cinéastes are cautioned: each film will be shown on one day only!(July 10-August 14; tickets $7.)

JAZZ WEEKEND
Wynton Marsalis is artistic adviser to SummerScape’s first foray into jazz presentations for the festival’s closing weekend. Two bands will play during the weekend. First up will be Vince Giordano and his Nighthawks, an 11-piece orchestra led by the multitalented Vince Giordano on aluminum bass, tuba, and bass sax. The group recreates red-hot swing-era ambience with lots of danceable moxie. Vince’s group has achieved instantaneous fame through the 2004 movie The Aviator, but has also played for uptown gigs at the Waldorf Astoria, Metropolitan Museum, New York City Ballet and the Times Square Grille. (August 26; tickets $55, $40, $25)

Jazz at Lincoln Center’s weekend in the country also brings Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra and its 18 sizzling soloists to the Hudson Valley. “There’s nothing you can do with such an exhilarating performance except submit, with pleasure,” wrote a Jazz Times critic of a recent appearance. (August 27; tickets $55, $40, $25)

MUSICAL THEATER
The Golden Apple
A concert presentation of the classic Broadway musical by Jerome Moross and John LaTouche. Jonathan Tunick will conduct the American Symphony Orchestra. (August 28; tickets $55, $40, $25)

CABARET (NIGHTSCAPE)
Bard’s Resnick Theater Studio is the major venue for presentations that instantly became a beloved part of SummerScape two years ago. The Studio is a post-performance gathering place for audience and artists alike, and the Cabaret performances enliven the atmosphere. Ann Carlson, a choreographer and performance artist best known for her singular blend of movement, voice, sound, and visual elements, will appear on July 9. The Flying Neutrinos, a quintet led by vocalist Ingrid Lucia, performs alternative New Orleans music, blending blues, jazz, and funky street beats (July 23). Brooklyn’s the Hungry March Band has lit up the Coney Island Mermaid Day Parade. Voted Best Anarchist Parade Group by the Village Voice, the band, which has also graced Lincoln Center Out of Doors, can be experienced at Bard on July 30. Gloria Deluxe, a band led by Obie-winner Cynthia Hopkins, can transform itself effortlessly from a torchy house band in a Berlin lounge to the last act in a Nashville bar and back again. On August 6 it can be experienced at Bard. (July 9, 23 & 30, August 6; $25 and $10)

More program details are given below. A separate press release will give full details about the Bard Music Festival. In the near future, Bard College’s Fisher Center web site will have more complete information and updates. The site provides phone numbers, ticket information, and directions for getting to Bard (only 90 minutes north of Manhattan). Tickets can be purchased as of May 2, by phone from the SummerScape box office (845) 758-7900 or on the Fisher Center web site, www.bard.edu/fishercenter.

Bard SummerScape Presentations by Genre:
OPERA
Regina, by Marc Blitzstein, based on Lillian Hellman’s play, The Little Foxes
American Symphony Orchestra, Leon Botstein, conductor
Friday, July 29 - Saturday, August 6, Sosnoff Theater
The Tender Land, by Aaron Copland, libretto by Erik Johns
American Symphony Orchestra, James Bagwell conducting
Thursday, August 4 - Friday, August 12, LUMA Theater

THEATER
Rocket to the Moon, by Clifford Odets
Thursday, July 14 - Sunday, July 24, LUMA Theater

DANCE
Cave of the Heart, Hérodiade, and Appalachian Spring by Martha Graham
Friday, July 8 - Sunday, July 10, Sosnoff Theater

FILMS BY WILLIAM WYLER
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Thursday, July 28
Come and Get It (1936), Thursday, July 14
Dodsworth (1936), Sunday, July 10
The Heiress* (1949), Sunday, July 31
Jezebel (1938), Thursday, July 21
The Little Foxes (1941), Sunday, July 24
The Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress (1944), Sunday, August 7
The Westerner (1940), Sunday, July 17
OTHER FILMS:
The City* (1939), Sunday, August 7
The Cummington Story* (1945), Sunday, August 7
Of Mice and Men* (1939), Thursday, August 4
Once Upon a Time# (1974), Sunday, August 14
Our Town* (1940), Thursday, August 11
The Plow that Broke the Plains+ (1936), Thursday, July 14
Redes (Fishermen’ Nets) / The Wave (1936), Sunday, July 31
The River+ (1938), Sunday, July 17
The Red Pony* (1949), Sunday, August 14
* score by Aaron Copland; + score by Virgil Thomson; # score by Darius Milhaud
All films will be screened in the Avery Film Center

JAZZ WEEKEND
Vince Giordano and his Nighthawks, Friday, August 26, Sosnoff Theater
Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra with Arturo O’Farrill, Saturday,August 27, Sosnoff Theater

CABARET – NIGHTSCAPE
Ann Carlson, Saturday, July 9, Resnick Theater Studio
The Flying Neutrinos, Saturday, July 23, Resnick Theater Studio
The Hungry March Band, Saturday, July 30, Sosnoff Theater Entrance
Gloria Deluxe, Saturday, August 6, Resnick Theater Studio

* * *

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL – Aaron Copland And His World

Aaron Copland (1900–90) was 20th-century America’s most prominent composer. Born in Brooklyn, he found a unique way of reconciling modernism with music that evoked the landscape and spirit of America. He staunchly advocated a distinctive American voice that could reach a wide public and promoted the careers of a broad range of North and South American composers. His music and personality cut across the traditional boundaries of the concert hall; he was influenced by jazz, worked in Hollywood, and collaborated in theater and dance. His life and career, which spanned nearly the entire 20th century, offer a fascinating mirror of American life, its politics, popular culture, and conflicting self-images – a mirror that reflects the Gershwins, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Martha Graham, Clifford Odets, Thornton Wilder, Harold Clurman, Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Paul Strand, Virgil Thomson, Roy Harris, Samuel Barber, Roger Sessions, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, and Leonard Bernstein.

In this year’s Bard Music Festival, biography and history form a natural partnership. At a time when the significance of modernism is being reevaluated – when, indeed, our entire conception of the 20th century is itself in the process of transformation – the achievement of Copland and his closest colleagues and protégés seems more than ever the powerful evocation of a distinctly American 20th-century voice. The American Symphony Orchestra, with Leon Botstein, music director, is the orchestra in residence.

Among the many composers whose works will be performed during the Bard Music Festival in addition to Aaron Copland are George Antheil, Leonard Bernstein, Pierre Boulez, Benjamin Britten, John Cage, Elliott Carter, Carlos Chávez, Henry Cowell, Ruth Crawford, Mario Davidovsky, David Del Tredici, David Diamond, George Gershwin, Alberto Ginastera, Lou Harrison, Charles Ives, Jerome Kern, Darius Milhaud, Conlon Nancarrow, Walter Piston, Richard Rodgers, Ned Rorem, William Schuman, Roger Sessions, Igor Stravinsky, Virgil Thomson, Heitor Villa-Lobos, and Edgard Varèse.

MUSICAL THEATER
The Golden Apple
A concert presentation of the classic Broadway musical
Music by Jerome Moross
Book and lyrics by John LaTouche
The American Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jonathan Tunick
Sunday, August 28, Sosnoff Theater

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL WEEKEND ONE

Friday, August 12
Program One
Aaron Copland: An American Master
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
8:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 8:30 pm Performance: All-Copland program
Tickets $45/35/20

Saturday, August 13
Panel One
Memory and History
Olin Hall
10:00 am – noon

Program Two
Paris, Boulanger, and Jazz
Olin Hall
1:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 1:30 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Igor Stravinsky, George Gershwin, Leo Ornstein, Marion Bauer, Virgil Thomson, Louis Gruenberg, Israel Citkowitz, and Darius Milhaud
Tickets $30

Program Three
Copland, the Early Years
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
7:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 8:00 pm Orchestral Performance: Music by Copland, George Antheil, and Virgil Thomson. American Symphony Orchestra, Leon Botstein, Conductor
Tickets $55/40/25

Sunday, August 14
Panel Two
The Private and the Public Copland: Issues of Personal and National Identity
Olin Hall
10:00 am – noon

Program Four
Copland, Advocate of Contemporary American Music
Olin Hall
1:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 1:30 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Charles Ives, Ruth Crawford, Henry Cowell, Dane Rudhyar, Colin McPhee, Roger Sessions, Carl Ruggles, and Edgard Varèse
Tickets $30

Program Five
Varieties in Engagement: The American Jewish Composer
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
4:30 pm Preconcert Talk, 5:00 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Rubin Goldmark, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, and Leonard Bernstein<
Tickets $45/35/20

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL WEEKEND TWO

Friday, August 19
Symposium
Mid-Twentieth-Century American Culture and Politics
Bertelsmann Campus Center
10:00 am – noon and 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Program Six
South of the Border
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
7:30 pm Preconcert Talk 8:00 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Carlos Chávez, Silvestre Revueltas, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Alberto Ginastera, Domingo Santa Cruz, Conlon Nancarrow, and Mario Davidovsky
Tickets $45/35/20

Saturday, August 20
Program Seven
Aaron Copland and the Folk Revival
Olin Hall
10:00 am Performance with Commentary
Tickets $20

Program Eight
The Lure of Neoclassicism
Olin Hall
1:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 1:30 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Paul Bowles, William Schuman, Walter Piston, Igor Stravinsky, Irving Fine, Elliott Carter, and David Diamond
Tickets $30

Program Nine
In Search of a New National Voice
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
7:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 8:00 pm Orchestral Performance: Music by Samuel Barber, Copland, Jerome Kern, Elie Siegmeister, Carlos Chávez, and Roy Harris. American Symphony Orchestra; Leon Botstein, conductor
Tickets $55/40/25

Sunday, August 21
Panel Three
Copland’s Legacy: A Conversation with Composers
Olin Hall
10:00 am – noon

Program Ten
Tanglewood and Postwar Tensions
Olin Hall
1:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 1:30 pm Performance: Music by Copland, Lukas Foss, Benjamin Britten, John Cage, Lou Harrison, Ned Rorem, Arthur Berger, David Del Tredici, and Pierre Boulez
Tickets $30

Program Eleven
The Triumph of the American Symphonic Tradition
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Sosnoff Theater
4:00 pm Preconcert Talk, 5:00 pm Orchestral Performance: Music by Copland, Roger Sessions, and William Grant Still. American Symphony Orchestra; Leon Botstein, conductor
Tickets $55/40/25

Bard SummerScape and Bard Music Festival
in Chronological Order


Friday, July 8: Bard SummerScape Opens
8:00 pm Martha Graham Dance; Sosnoff Theater

Saturday, July 9
8:00 pm Martha Graham Dance; Sosnoff Theater
10:00 pm NightScape; Ann Carlson; Resnick Theater Studio

Sunday, July 10
3:00 pm Martha Graham Dance; Sosnoff Theater
7:00 pm Film Series – Dodsworth; Avery Film Center

Thursday, July 14
7:00 pm Film Series – Come and Get It and
The Plow that Broke the Plains; Avery Film Center
8:00 pm Rocket to the Moon (preview); LUMA Theater

Friday, July 15
8:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater

Saturday, July 16
8:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater

Sunday, July 17
3:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater
7:00 pm Film Series – The Westerner and The River; Avery Film Center

Thursday, July 21
7:00 pm Film Series – Jezebel; Avery Film Center

Friday, July 22
8:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater

Saturday, July 23
8:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater
10:00 pm NightScape – The Flying Neutrinos; Resnick Theater Studio

Sunday, July 24
3:00 pm Rocket to the Moon; LUMA Theater
7:00 pm Film Series – The Little Foxes; Avery Film Center

Thursday, July 28
7:00 pm Film Series – The Best Years of Our Lives; Avery Film Center

Friday, July 29
8:00 pm Regina; Sosnoff Theater

Saturday, July 30
9:00 pm NightScape – The Hungry March Band; Sosnoff Theater Entrance

Sunday, July 31
3:00 pm Regina Sosnoff Theater
7:00 pm Film Series – The Heiress and Redes (Fishermen’s Nets)/The Wave; Avery Film Center

Wednesday, August 3
8:00 pm Regina; Sosnoff Theater

Thursday, August 4
7:00 pm Film Series – Of Mice and Men; Avery Film Center
8:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater

Friday, August 5
8:00 pm Regina; Sosnoff Theater

Saturday, August 6
3:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater
8:00 pm Regina; Sosnoff Theater
10:00 pm NightScape – Gloria Deluxe; Resnick Theater Studio

Sunday, August 7
3:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater
7:00 pm Film Series – The Memphis Belle and The City and The Cummington Story; Avery Film Center

Wednesday, August 10
8:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater

Thursday, August 11
7:00 pm Film Series – Our Town; Avery Film Center
8:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater

Friday, August 12 –
Bard Music Festival: Weekend One Opens

5:00 pm The Tender Land; LUMA Theater
8:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
8:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Program One; Sosnoff Theater
“Aaron Copland: An American Master”

Saturday, August 13
10:00 am Bard Music Festival - Panel One; Olin Hall
“Memory and History”
1:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Olin Hall
1:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Two; Olin Hall
“Paris, Boulanger, and Jazz”
7:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
8:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Three; Sosnoff Theater
“Copland, the Early Years”

Sunday, August 14
10:00 am Bard Music Festival – Panel Two; Olin Hall
“The Private and the Public Copland: Issues of Personal and National Identity”
1:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Olin Hall
1:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Four; Olin Hall
“Copland, Advocate of Contemporary American Music”
4:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
5:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Five; Sosnoff Theater
“Varieties in Engagement: The American Jewish Composer”
7:00 pm Film Series – The Red Pony and Once Upon a Time; Avery Film Center


Friday, August 19 –
Bard Music Festival: Weekend Two opens
10:00 am Bard Music Festival – Symposium; Bertelsmann Campus Center
“Mid-Twentieth-Century American Culture and Politics”
1:30 am Bard Music Festival – Symposium (cont.); Bertelsmann Campus Center
7:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
8:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Six; Sosnoff Theater
“South of the Border”

Saturday, August 20
10:00 am Bard Music Festival – Program Seven; Olin Hall
“Aaron Copland and the Folk Revival”
1:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Olin Hall
1:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Eight; Olin Hall
“The Lure of Neoclassicism”
7:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
8:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Nine; Sosnoff Theater
“In Search of a New National Voice”

Sunday, August 21
10:00 am Bard Music Festival – Panel Three Olin Hall
“Copland’s Legacy: A Conversation with Composers”
1:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Olin Hall
1:30 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Ten; Olin Hall
“Tanglewood and Postwar Tensions”
4:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Preconcert Talk; Sosnoff Theater
5:00 pm Bard Music Festival – Program Eleven; Sosnoff Theater
“The Triumph of the American Symphonic Tradition”

Friday, August 26
8:00 pm Jazz – Vince Giordano’s Nighthawks; Sosnoff Theater

Saturday, August 27 8:00 pm Jazz – Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra; Sosnoff Theater

Sunday, August 28 3:00 pm The Golden Apple; Sosnoff Theater

Bard SummerScape web site: www.fishercenter.bard.edu; Box Office: 845-758-7900

Bard Music Festival press contact: Mark Primoff (845) 758-7412, primoff@bard.edu
21C Media Group press contact: Glenn Petry (212)625-2038, gpetry@21cmediagroup.com

Website: http://fishercenter.bard.edu

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This event was last updated on 08-29-2005